Man’s Search for Meaning

This blog is a repost of a paper I had written for an assignment toward my bachelor in divinity through International College of Metaphysical Theology
This blog is a repost of a paper I had written for an assignment toward my bachelor in divinity through International College of Metaphysical Theology

Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl helped to confirm for me that my life truly has meaning, yet that meaning holds a great many questions for me still.

As I read the account of Viktor Frankl’s experiences in the Nazi concentration camps I became quickly self-aware of my own history, my personal experience and upbringing. Here I am, an American born citizen, raised in the back half of the twentieth century with all the indulgences and trappings of middle class, reading an account of a man who suffered extreme injustice, torment, and suffering yet through it was able to find meaning in his life. My first inclination was to wonder if the account would serve to justify the importance of suffering as a means of enabling a person to see one’s purpose, a notion no doubt fueled by the specific brand of Judeo-Christian religious upbringing of my childhood. Continue reading Man’s Search for Meaning

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Five of Pentacles

Five of Pentacles
An impoverished couple moves through the harsh cold elements while passing a potential area of refuge.

Often when we set an intention on a specific outcome we want to manifest, the desired outcome is based on something we are currently lacking in our lives. After all, desire is the quintessential component of intention setting.

However, what often stalls the process of seeing our desires manifested is our tendency to maintain focus on what we are lacking. We can find ourselves easily identifying with the undesired state in which we currently reside. We repeatedly remind ourselves of what we do not have, or we choose to focus on the absence of the things we desire for ourselves.

The harsh truth is, it can sometimes be rather compelling to focus on what we don’t have. Perhaps we use our lack as an opportunity to place ourselves in a victim role, which allows us to shift accountability outside ourselves. Or perhaps we may receive sympathy or compassion we may not otherwise receive outside our current circumstance. Continue reading Five of Pentacles